Thursday, March 01, 2018

LA Movie Theater Film Calendars 35mm and Digital


Here is a post of the links to each LA movie theater's film calendar while I'm on a posting hiatus, especially just to help those of you browsing on mobile. 

With mobile, you had to browse to bottom and click "desktop version" to see my "LA Film Calendars" links on the sidebar. It will still be there, but for everyone else here they are:

LA Film Calendars:

Specialty Theaters:

Friday, January 12, 2018

LA 35mm Film Screenings for week of Jan. 12 – 18


Hear ye, LA 35mm film screenings list is here! (Includes some digital.)

This is what's on my personal radar. You can browse the LA Film Calendars links on my side bar to find even more!  → → →

On mobile displays, you may need to click "Desktop Version" at bottom and then you can see the sidebar.

Sometimes these choices are tonight, FYI, and not necessarily listed first.

Note: There are no New Beverly listings below because they are closed for exciting improvements and updates.

UCLA Film & TV Archive
The Last Dawn (1917, Michael Curtiz)
and
A Million Bid (1927, Michael Curtiz)
Fri. (tonight) Jan. 12 7:30 pm
Gigantic silent film nerd alert! (So that’s just for me mainly.) Two rare, rare, rare silent films from Michael Curtiz, yes, the director of Casablanca (and literally nothing else, right?). If you’ve never experienced a silent film properly in a theater, on 35mm, with live musical accompaniment, as is the case here, you should go! It’s like seeing it how it originally was in 1917 and 1927. See what the towering art form of the age was doing before sound came in. Everyone was going to these. The first is a film from back when Curtiz was in Hungary, before his success brought him to Hollywood’s attention. And A Million Bid is his second Hollywood film, starring Dolores Costello and Warner Oland. (These are silent film stars you become familiar with as you delve into this other world of great films.) I don’t know if I can even find pictures from these films to post below, that’s how rare these are! (Okay, I found some.)

LACMA
They Live (1988, John Carpenter)
Thur. Jan. 18 7:30 pm
For those who missed They Live in 35mm at the New Beverly, you get another shot! Presented by Film Independent, the famous sci-fi cult film starring Roddy Piper and directed by John Carpenter will give you a chuckle and a good time, especially on its original screening format of 35mm. I can’t really describe it as a masterpiece, but it’s fun and quirky. But fans of it are positively rabid, so join them..!

Downtown Independent 
Org (1979, Fernando Birri) rare 177-min digital restoration
Tue. Jan. 16 7:30 pm

This sounds amazing, something about switching heads and starring Terrence Hill, the frequent comedy Spaghetti Western star (most notably My Name is Nobody by Sergio Leone) and Super Fuzz star..?!  But it’s avant-garde, let’s kindly disclose that. This is co-presented with Los Angeles Film Forum, purveyors of fine avant-garde fare, but showing in the Downtown Independent’s lovely large screening facility, and it’s part of that series on Experimental Cinema in Latin America (in this case Argentinian). Read the link for more details, but it’s rarely been shown in anything but an abridged version, and it originally premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 1979.

Aero Theatre
Peeping Tom (1960, Michael Powell)
and
Diva (1981, Jean-Jacques Beineix)
Fri. (tonight) Jan. 12 7:30 pm
Peeping Tom is sometimes considered an overlooked British Psycho (of the same year), by one of the great directors of all-time—well, more specifically he was greatest as part of the directing team of Powell & Pressburger (The Red Shoes) and is here off on his own with his most well-known solo effort. It’s well worth watching. Diva is considered an ’80s landmark French film, especially for our MTV pop culture music video world of the time. I don’t recall loving it when I watched it much later on DVD, but I was probably still too close to the time period. It is a bit of a suspense thriller if that helps. These screenings are also a tribute to awesome revival film distributor Rialto Pictures, responsible for many restoration screenings in theaters of essential foreign and classic films. There are a few more in the Rialto series, all ironically DCP, but check out Aero’s site for other worthy items. Both screenings DCP.

Egyptian Theatre
El Topo (1970, Alejandro Jodorowsky)
and
Fando & Lis (1968, Alejandro Jodorowsky)
Sat. Jan. 13 7:30 pm
Apparently Los Angeles loves Alejandro Jodorowsky, as they screen his films sooo often! But they’re intriguing art film experiments, so worth checking out, albeit DCP screenings here. He also has an exhibit of his art works at Blum & Poe coming up that this screening is cross-promotion for, but hey if you love intriguing in-your-face mind-bending cinema, then go for the films. He’s a cult director who disappeared off the map for a while, but you might have heard about his latest, well-worth-watching film, Endless Poetry. So a look back at his prime works is well worth doing. I was a big fan of Fando & Lis when it came out on DVD, but weirdly I almost enjoyed it more after hearing his audio commentary on it. Very enlightening in what he was trying to do with that film. It’s also his first feature, and if I recall was a bit surrealist and Buñuelian.

Egyptian Theatre
The Holy Mountain (1973, Alejandro Jodorowsky) Jodorowsky in person!
and
Santa Sangre (1989, Alejandro Jodorowsky)
Sun. Jan. 14 7:30 pm
It’s even more Jodorowsky. Just read the above blurb, please. (Note: site says sold out, but stand-by line.) Both DCP screenings yeah, sorry, what can you do. But I have never seen Santa Sangre, oversight on my part, so might good time to check it out! Holy Mountain’s cult movie status reputation should precede it, but search the Internet or some books if you don’t know about it.


UCLA Film & TV Archive
Doctor X (1932, Michael Curtiz)
and
Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933, Michael Curtiz)
and
The Kennel Murder Case (1933, Michael Curtiz)
Sat. Jan. 13 7:30 pm
My curiosity about the great guy who directed the masterpiece Casablanca and nothing nearly as well-known doesn’t quite extend to his sound films, although since I am fascinated by anything silent, was very excited to see his early silent (!) films on Friday, notated above. However, this is a very exciting triple feature in 35mm, so if I was going to delve into the quality of Curtiz’s pre-Casablanca oeuvre, this would be the optimal way to do it, and if you are a horror genre aficionado, you don’t really want to miss this rare treat! (Well, the last one is hard-boiled crime/detective, but close enough.) Also, the first two have Fay Wray in them (star of 1933 King Kong) and her work is far too overlooked, so I’d say it’s worth seeing her star turns here. And you even get Eugene Pallette (the best gruff voice in movie history) showing up in the third film. Honestly, all in 35mm? I’d say go! The first two are even in color. For film dates that early (only shortly after sound in 1927), that is a fairly rare treat. In fact, the first one, Doctor X, is still with two-strip technicolor, before they developed three-strip! (It looks different, fascinating to check out.)


Coming Next Week

Egyptian Theatre
The Dance of Reality (2013, Alejandro Jodorowsky) Jodorowsky in person!
and
Endless Poetry (2016, Alejandro Jodorowsky)
Sat. Jan. 20 7:30 pm
So if you were watching last week for his cult classics being re-screened, here’s where the resurfacing of Jodorowsky occurred after a long absence. I have seen Endless Poetry and give it an enthusiastic thumbs-up for Fellini-esque visuals and mind-bending journey, if not quite as satisfying as a Fellini movie, because it tilts a bit more avant-garde (but just a bit). It’s really the most artistic thing you might see created in the current day on this scale (or maybe Twin Peaks: The Return as well). It really straddles that line between profound personal exploration and narcissism, landing just a tad too much on the narcissistic side, but not enough for me to not highly recommend it. Plus I am fascinated by his life story just enough to endure that aspect. So I have to catch up and watch The Dance of Reality as they are part of a trilogy (one still to come), and I just happened to miss that one! I was skeptical of what his return might be, but it’s really been pretty great. Both screenings DCP, but they were also shot digitally (pretty sure), so there’s not a better option to see these anyway! NOTE: He’s in person, and it’s listed as sold out. There will be a standby line.

Egyptian Theatre
Beauty and the Beast (1946, Jean Cocteau)
and
Donkey Skin (1970, Jacques Demy)
Sun. Jan. 21 7:30 pm
Beauty and the Beast is a luminously photographed black-and-white fantasy by a major avant-garde director, Jean Cocteau, being screened here in luscious 35mm, so should you miss this major work?! No! Okay, I’m slightly mixing up my memory of that same director’s beautiful Orpheus, and I don’t remember this one quite as well, but we all know the story so it’s more relatable than most avant-garde films, and I think it’s not heavy on the avant-garde stuff, so what I’m saying is it’s a great introduction to Cocteau, and a stupendous way to watch an earlier telling of this famous tale. Donkey Skin I have not seen, but Jacques Demy, to me, is hit and miss, but really big when he hits. So he’s often worth a look, so might as well stay for it! Plus it stars Catherine Deneuve and Jean Marais. (Beauty and the Beast in 35mm. Donkey Skin in DCP).

Egyptian Theatre
Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985, Tim Burton)
Wed. Jan. 24 7:30 pm
In 35mm with a devoted audience would be the perfect way to see this, so check it out. It’s preceded by a podcast recording from Whose Line Is It Anyway? stellar improv comedian Greg Proops, a very fun event all around. It’s also a Tim Burton film, in case that does anything for you, which it should! (Podcast approximately 30 minutes, film starting about 8:00 pm.)

Friday, December 15, 2017

35mm Film Screenings in LA not named Star Wars


That movie that just came out isn’t the movie you’re looking for. The movie you want to see is in 35mm. You can go about your business.

Ignore that thing that just came out! Here we’re in the business of 35mm film screenings in LA! (Reluctantly including a smattering of retro digital screenings.)  

Side note, that “big film” was shot on 35mm and some scenes 70mm IMAX but sadly is not (yet) being screened in 35mm (or 70mm IMAX) any closer than San Jose.! (70mm IMAX in San Jose, and I’m unaware of a single 35mm option.) But don’t drive to San Jose, because JJ scans it in at 2k anyway, so it loses the IMAX resolution and doesn’t look that great scanned back out on a computer onto film, or at least is not as beautiful and essential as the Nolan ones.

Anyway, that isn’t the movie you’re looking for! Let’s go about your real (reel?) business:

This is just what's on my personal radar. You can browse the LA Film Calendars links on my side bar to find even more!  → → →

On mobile displays, you may need to click "Desktop Version" at bottom and then you can see the sidebar.

Sometimes these choices are tonight, FYI, and not necessarily listed first.

New Beverly
The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston)
and
The Black Bird (1975, David Giler)
Sun. Dec. 17 6:30 pm/8:40pm
Mon Dec. 18 7:30 pm/9:40pm
The Maltese Falcon is basically a perfect movie to me. It’s Bogie at his best, and a knife to the heart cuts unexpectedly deep in what is not your average film noir, from the novel by the greatest hard-boiled writer Dashiell Hammett. Mary Astor will melt you, plus Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet and Elisha Cook Jr. will blow you away with the best character-actor performances ever! Plus we get to see the spoof The Black Bird with George Segal and awesome French star Stéphane Audran (and Elisha Cook Jr. again) by just staying in our seats after the first film, no extra charge. Both 35mm!

Egyptian Theatre
Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean) in 70mm!
Fri. (tonight!) Dec. 15 7:30 pm
Sat. Dec. 16 7:30 pm
Sun. Dec. 17 7:30 pm
As actual film gets harder to see projected, it should be a treat to see this in 70mm if you haven’t already seen it 10 times before..! Which some may have. Do it justice and see this film that was shot in 70mm projected on 70mm in a brand-new print on one of the biggest, best screens in LA. It’s a wide sweeping tale with ramifications about politics and the formation of governments that should intrigue even today. This will also show Dec. 28, 29, and 30 at 7:30 pm.

UCLA Film & TV Archive
Night and the City (1950, Jules Dassin) Nitrate 35mm print!
Sat. Dec. 16 7:30 pm
Jules Dassin is awesome! My favorite of his is really Thieves’ Highway, but Criterion likes this one a lot, so check out this amazing London-set film noir starring Richard Widmark, Gene Tierney and more! This is a nitrate 35mm film print, which is the highly flammable earlier iteration of film prints (and why so many films are lost, they burned up!) but which looks sooo much better, as the extra silver nitrate adds more sparkle to the luminous black and white photography (here by Max Greene). Additionally, as if that wasn’t rare enough, they are showing the British release version of the film which runs six minutes longer than the U.S. release and features alternate opening and closing scenes as well as different score by composer Benjamin Frankel. Plus there is a nitrate newsreel “News of the Day” and a nitrate short.

LACMA
Ride the Pink Horse (1947, Robert Montgomery)
Tue. Dec. 19 1:00 pm
The lovely rare screenings of film noir 35mm prints at LACMA’s Tuesday matinees continues this week with a fairly good one from Robert Montgomery. There is some stupendous stuff in this one, including, pay attention, the opening shot is one of those super-long unbroken takes. I didn’t notice the first time I saw it, because it works so seamlessly with the action that transpires. So watch how long the opening shot takes to cut. There are some great characterizations in this film by Montgomery especially, and also Wanda Hendrix, Andrea King, and Thomas Gomez. I feel like it doesn’t coalesce into the tightest of all film noirs by the end, but it’s pretty damn good. Definitely something to try to see in a theater on the big screen.

New Beverly
Victor/Victoria (1982, Blake Edwards)
and
Murphy’s Romance (1985, Martin Ritt)
Fri. (tonight!) Dec. 15 6:30 pm/9:15 pm
Sat. Dec. 16 6:30 pm/9:15 pm
More James Garner stuff, little mini-festival going on I guess..! This is purely on my radar because I never saw these, and seeing stuff like this in 35mm on the big screen at the New Bev is the best way to check out anything you previously overlooked. Martin Ritt has directed great films elsewhere, not sure he holds the same appeal into the ’80s, but I’d give it a look. The Victor/Victoria one sounds more fun, as a musical comedy of fake female impersonation. I don’t know, it may still suck. These are the films that were aimed at my parents when I was growing up, so not too sure!

Egyptian Theatre
It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
Thur. Dec. 21 7:30 pm
Fri. Dec. 22 7:30 pm
It’s the biggest, best screen you can see this essential classic, heartwarming film on. Albeit DCP, this is a worthy outing. This is such a sublime example of filmmaking that exceeds the already awesome trappings of classic Hollywood cinema to become even more iconic and enduring – and so moving upon first viewing. It doesn’t have to be classic to recommend it, it’s just so good!

Aero Theatre
A Star is Born (1954, George Cukor)
Fri. (tonight!) Dec. 15 7:30 pm
This is such a stunningly beautiful film on a big screen. It’s DCP and I so wish it was on film, but it should still look luminous. Especially if it’s in its correct super-wide 2.55:1 aspect ratio! It’s such a moving film as well. I used to rarely like musicals that had little or no dancing until I saw this one, which tugs at the emotions very effectively. I’m doing an awful job describing this film! Guess it’s been a while, but it’s essential to me.

The Academy
Miracle on 34th Street (1947, George Seaton)
Tue. Dec. 19 7:00 pm
I don’t really think I would like this movie, but it’s a new 35mm print, and that’s special. Am I a Grinch? I guess so! But this is on one of the biggest, best screens in Los Angeles (the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater), for a bargain 5 bucks! And Maureen O’Hara, John Payne, and Edmund Gwenn are no slouches as actors. Definitely go if you like (or would like) this movie. Plus enjoy holiday cookies and pictures with Santa after the screening. Are you kidding?! What an event!

Aero Theatre
The Sound of Music (1965, Robert Wise)
Sat. Dec. 16 7:30 pm
This isn’t really on my radar, but it seems to draw an audience always, so this is just a public service announcement that this famous Rodgers and Hammerstein film is playing near you. Albeit on DCP. But a nice big screen.

Aero Theatre
White Christmas (1954, Michael Curtiz)
and
Holiday Inn (1942, Mark Sandrich)
Sun. Dec. 17 7:30 pm
The convenience of DCP I guess makes this holiday treat possible. Treat or terror?! I don’t know because I haven’t seen either of these. (Your friendly neighborhood cinephile Grinch here.) But it should be a great way to see these heartwarming classics on the big screen for the holidays if you choose to.

Aero Theatre
Bad Santa (2003, Terry Zwigoff)
and
Trading Places (1983, John Landis)
Thur. Dec. 21 7:30 pm
This double feature is far more pleasing to your neighborhood cinephile Grinch! I’d watch these. Again, they are DCP, but this is a nice, big screen and these are some fun films. See Eddie Murphy at his best and there's a lot to love about the dark comedic edge of Bad Santa embodied by Billy Bob Thornton and excellent cast including the late Bernie Mac, Brett Kelly, and Tony Cox.

New Beverly
Reservoir Dogs (1992, Quentin Tarantino)
Fri. (tonight!) Dec. 15 11:59 pm
I rarely bother to point out these Tarantino midnight screenings, since they are almost every week, but, hey, reminder, they are always 35mm, and this one especially is a superb film. It'll have 'em laughing in the aisles! Or was it that it would have audience members running for the exits with heart troubles?  Can't remember! Better watch and find out.


Coming Next Week

Aero Theatre
Cluny Brown (1946, Ernst Lubitsch)
and
Trouble in Paradise (1932, Ernst Lubitsch)
Thur. Dec. 28 7:30 pm
Major highlight here. The great comic director Ernst Lubitsch (he’s more than just comic, a true auteur) on the big screen in one 4k DCP restoration and the other a 35mm print of one of my favorites! The first is with Jennifer Jones and is his last complete film about which I don’t know a lot, haven’t seen it yet. The second is in luminous 35mm, and is an excellent, hilarious film, with Herbert Marshall, Miriam Hopkins (she is always awesome, do not miss her!) and Kay Francis. What a treat buried in the middle of the holidays. You don’t get to see this stuff screened too often anymore.

New Beverly
The Poseidon Adventure (1972, Ronald Neame)
and
Beyond the Poseidon Adventure (1979, Irwin Allen)
Wed. Dec. 27 7:30 pm/10:00 pm
Thur. Dec. 28 7:30 pm/10:00 pm
I loves me some disaster movies! Double dose!? IN 35mm no less, I am excited. All-star casts were the name of the game in the disaster movie heyday with Hackman, Borgnine, Shelley Winters, Roddy McDowall and more. Then in #2 you’ve got Michael Caine, Telly Savalas, Sally Field, Karl Malden, Shirley Jones, Jack Warden, Peter Boyle, Slim Pickens, Mark Harmon. And they’re all gonna die! Yes! This is the type of weird awesome slightly shitty 1970s world I want to pretend to live in at the New Beverly. Oh, the plot? Their boat is upside-down and they’re stuck.

New Beverly
The Hateful 8 (Roadshow Version) (2015, Quentin Tarantino)
Mon. Dec. 25 8:00 pm
No snow in LA? Gobble up generous helpings in this snowbound epic..! It’s the roadshow version, and while shot in 70mm, it’s gonna look just stupendous in 35mm at the New Bev. And the score is to die for (Ennio Morricone).

New Beverly
It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
and
A Christmas Story (1983, Bob Clark)
Fri. Dec. 22 6:30pm/9:10pm
Sat. Dec. 23 6:30pm/9:10pm
While there are options below in DCP, leave it to the New Beverly to be the only place you can see these two classics in 35mm on the big screen! The first is such a sublime example of filmmaking that even exceeds the wonderful trappings of classic Hollywood cinema to become something even more iconic and enduring – totally moving from first viewing. And well, if you didn’t grow up watching A Christmas Story I just don’t know you! It’s okay for fun on television at home, but is it worthy of the big screen? See if it holds up.

LACMA
Circle of Danger (1951, Jacques Tourneur)
Tue. Dec. 26 1:00 pm
Another film noir at LACMA in their 1:00 pm Tuesday matinee slot. I don’t know anything about this one, but it’s been a good series so far! They were all 35mm up to now, but this one doesn’t say, so I’m not sure. But it does have Ray Milland and Marius Goring and is about “an American who comes to England to find out the truth behind his brother's death during a commando operation in occupied France.”

New Beverly
Elf (2003, Jon Favreau)
Sat. Dec. 23 2:00 pm
Sun Dec. 24 2:00 pm
Unless you want to see the digital screenings below, this kiddee matinee is the one to see since it’s in 35mm! I haven’t seen the film, but people seem to like it.

New Beverly
Die Hard (1988, John McTiernan)
and
Die Hard 2: Die Harder (1990, Renny Harlin)
Sun. Dec. 24 6:30pm/9:15 pm
What better way to spend Christmas Eve than watching the first two Die Hards in 35mm?! It’s the New Bev again with the inside track on the best way to experience it. First film is sold out already, but a standby line the night of the event. Or you can still get tickets for just the sequel I guess.

Aero Theatre
Elf (2003, Jon Favreau)
Fri. Dec. 22 7:30 pm
You’ve heard people rave, now go see for yourself. I can’t comment, still haven’t seen it yet! Maybe I’ll be there?? (This screening DCP.)

Egyptian Theatre
It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
Fri. Dec. 22 7:30 pm
It’s the biggest, best screen you can see this essential classic, heartwarming film on (oops, except check New Bev for a 35mm screening). Albeit DCP, this is a worthy outing. This is such a sublime example of filmmaking that even exceeds the wonderful trappings of classic Hollywood cinema to become even more iconic and enduring –totally moving from first viewing. It doesn’t have to be classic to recommend it, it’s just that good!

Aero Theatre
It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
Sat. Dec.  23 4:00 pm and 7:30 pm
Guys, there's a lot of originality in the screening selections this month. This time at the Aero, it’s the West side’s biggest, best screen you can see this essential classic, heartwarming film on. Albeit DCP, this is a worthy outing. This is such a sublime example of filmmaking that even exceeds the wonderful trappings of classic Hollywood cinema to become something even more iconic and enduring –totally moving from first viewing. It doesn’t have to be classic to recommend it, it’s just that good!

Egyptian Theatre
Jingle All the Way (1996, Brian Levant) Brian Levant in person!
and
Die Hard (1988, John McTiernan)
Sat. Dec. 23 7:30 pm
I don’t know why you’d want to do this to yourself, but here it is! Finally Jingle All the Way on the big screen with the director in person. Can you believe it? And for good measure, watch fricking Die Hard right after on the Egyptian’s huge screen. Best way to see what may be the most diabolically concocted double feature ever. Load up on egg nog but not too much so you can sober up by the time Die Hard starts maybe. (This screening DCP.)

Egyptian Theatre
Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean) in 70mm!
Thur. Dec. 28 7:30 pm
Fri. Dec. 29 7:30 pm
Sat. Dec. 30 7:30 pm
Ye olde holiday favorite is back again already after last week. As actual film gets harder to see projected, it should be a treat to see this in 70mm if you haven’t already seen it like 10 times before..! Which some may have. Do it justice and see this film that was shot in 70mm projected on 70mm in a brand-new print on one of the biggest, best screens in LA. It’s a wide sweeping tale with ramifications about politics and the formation of governments that should intrigue even today.

New Beverly
Reservoir Dogs (1992, Quentin Tarantino)
Fri. Dec. 22 11:59 pm
I know I rarely bother to point out these Tarantino midnight screenings, since they are almost every week, but, hey, reminder, they are always 35mm, and this one especially is a superb film. It'll have 'em laughing in the aisles! Or was it that it would have audience members running for the exits with heart troubles?  Can't remember! Better watch and find out.