Friday, July 21, 2017

LA Screenings Not to Miss This Week

Here are MY picks for the top screenings this week in LA if you are ready to get off your arse and watch some awesome 35mm film..! (in sweet air-conditioning) instead of reading this on a phone in your hand on Twitter, you could be in the theater watching some of these!

If you want to make your own decisions (who does that?!), browse the LA Film Calendars links on my side bar  → → →

Some of these are tonight, FYI.

Egyptian Theatre  
If... (1968, Lindsay Anderson)
and  
Performance (1970, Donald Cammell, Nicholas Roeg)
7:30pm
At the Egyptian tonight Friday July 21 is If... and Performance, two landmark films of a sort of British "new wave" this is basically the greatest double feature I could ever imagine being concocted.   

If... is Malcolm McDowell gone mad in a British boarding school. And Performance is James Fox as a despicable London gangster who hides out from his bosses with a bunch of hippie musicians led by Mick Jagger who "open his eyes." They're both mind benders of the trippy '60s/'70s variety (not like a Matrix plot-twist). The only drawback is that you should really only see one at a time to fully absorb. This is the double feature of the year in my book. Both on 35mm film.
EGYPTIAN LINK



Old Town Music Hall
Fri 8:15pm, Sat 2:30 and 8:15pm, Sun 2:30pm
"All-Star Comedy Festival"
This weekend the Old Town Music Hall has its best program of the year, a rare treat, esp. if you live near the beach, with its "All-Star Comedy Festival" of silent and sound comedy shorts, always exquisitely selected, on 35mm and 16mm film. Every show begins with music played on the pipe organ, an audience sing along (I'm not kidding!), and a comedy short.
OLD TOWN MUSIC HALL LINK


Universal CityWalk IMAX
Dunkirk (2017, Christopher Nolan) in 70mm IMAX
Various showtimes
Okay, of course I rarely highlight current releases here, but this is a very special and rare event to see a film the majority of which was shot using 70mm IMAX cameras actually projected in 70mm IMAX on film. This is the case with Dunkirk (2017) by Christopher Nolan.

The only other place near LA showing it on film is Irvine, and there is also a "laser IMAX" (not film) at the TCL Chinese Theatre, but for me, I'd recommend seeing the highest-possible-resolution film format, which still exceeds digital (I think, right?), projected in the same native format it was shot on. Don't miss this. It doesn't play here on 70mm film forever, maybe a couple weeks, before the chance is gone.

Similar experiences were possible with Interstellar and some of his previous films, but the list of 70mm film theaters has dwindled, and, for me, seeing Interstellar in 70mm IMAX was really incredible visually, if you care about things like resolution (incredible detail on faces or in this movie maybe the ocean, etc.). It's really breathtaking.

Also note there is a HUGE difference between regular 70mm and IMAX 70mm. Imax is run through the film gate horizontally, instead of vertically, and while it uses the same 70mm film stock, what accounts for the extraordinary image quality is it is exposing a far larger surface area of the film stock (in a more square-ish aspect ratio) by this horizontal method, resulting in just stunning resolution. The projectors are somewhat rare and perhaps hard to maintain as to why the lack of availability to see it this way, and the extremely rare number of major film productions which utilize the format.

Here is the IMAX link to back up this info about it being the only place, and also for other cities outside of LA:
https://www.imax.com/news/experience-dunkirk-imax-70mm-film-and-imax-laser
AMC UNIVERSAL CITYWALK LINK


Billy Wilder Theatre (UCLA Film & TV Archive)
Days of Wine and Roses (1962, Blake Edwards)
and
Crime in the Streets (1956, Don Siegel)
Saturday July 22, 7:30 PM
One print in 35mm, the second in 16mm. Great deal regardless to see two classic films on beautiful film. Most know Days of Wine and Roses with Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick, and UCLA says of Crime in the Streets:
Director Don Siegel, hot off of his of his landmark classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), imbues the low-budget urban tale (originally staged on TV by Sidney Lumet) with trademark grit and intensity.
Crime in the Streets has John Cassavetes in it, and if you are the one person who doesn't like to watch John Cassavetes act, then don't go!
BILLY WILDER THEATRE LINK


Cinefamily
Stalker (1979, Andrei Tarkovsky)
Saturday July 22nd 7:00 pm 
Monday July 24th 8:00 pm
Along with other great stuff at Cinefamily, the new restoration of Tarkovsky's Stalker (1979) continues, showing twice this week, and these are the last 2 screenings! Seeing a great master's film on the big screen, the proper way, it's definitely going on my list. (This screening DCP)
A lot of other great stuff at Cinefamily, including the oddball The Happiness of the Katakuris continuing, so browse the Cinefamily calendar..!
CINEFAMILY LINK



New Beverly Cinema
Secret Agent Super Dragon (1966, Giorgio Ferroni) 
7:30pm
and 
Murder for Sale (1968, Renzo Cerrato, Jean-Pierre Desagnat)   
9:40pm
Wed July 26 and Thur July 27
Italian-made Euro spy films of the '60s riding the James Bond wave of a spy craze, in original 35mm IB Technicolor prints-- this is an original color film print creation process resulting in especially vibrant colors and such prints are a holy grail of cinema nerds. Plus the films sound crazy and outlandish in a great way. Check out the trailers. Batshit crazy quote from the trailer:
- Are you a natural redhead?
- You'll have to take my word for it. (beat) For now.
Good grief..!
NEW BEVERLY LINK




Aero Theatre
9 to 5 (1980, Colin Higgins)
and
The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982, Colin Higgins)
Sunday July 23 7:30 pm 
These just seem really fun to see on the big screen in this day and age. Especially if you're over on the West side of LA. 9 to 5 is undeniably fun, and I haven't seen the second one, but obviously I'd be sitting through both if I'm there! (These two screenings are DCP.)

AERO THEATRE LINK

NuArt Theatre 
Endless Poetry (2016, Alejandro Jodorowosky)
Playing all week
Continuing for another week, the NuArt Theatre (an LA institution) has the latest film by cult auteur Alejandro Jodorowsky (El Topo, The Holy Mountain) playing all week, including a bonus midnight screening of his The Holy Mountain (1973) TONIGHT only. Just look at that poster to get intrigued. I haven't seen the recent Jodorowsky movies since his reappearance on the scene, but he's a towering figure of late '60s and '70s cult art cinema, so if you're going to jaunt to the big screen, this is the type of film to do it on.
NUART LINK

Friday, July 14, 2017

LA Screenings of Note This Week

Here are MY picks for the top screenings this week in LA if you are ready to get off your ass and watch some awesome 35mm film..! (in sweet air-conditioning) instead of browsing through your Instagram feed just because it's conveniently in your hand... say no!

If you want to make your own decisions (who does that?!), browse the LA Film Calendars links on my side bar  → → →

The first two double features are TONIGHT, just FYI:

Egyptian Theatre 
7:30pm 
Subway (1985, Luc Besson)
and
Le Dernier Combat (1983, Luc Besson)
Tonight at the Egyptian is Subway and Le Dernier Combat, two early Luc Besson films. Subway (1985) is a hell of a trip back in time, esp. on 35mm, when fluorescent lights were captivating and Christopher Lambert has never been sillier, plus- plus!- Isabelle Adjani. I'm curious to see Le Dernier Combat (1983) which preceded it and features Jean Reno. On the Egyptian's giant screen? No better way. (Note: Subway is DCP, the other is 35mm.)
EGYPTIAN LINK


New Beverly Cinema
Westworld 7:00pm
and
Runaway 9:15pm
Also TONIGHT, the New Beverly has an intriguing double feature, also playing Saturday July 15 (So if you see the Luc Besson you can STILL see this too) of Westworld (1973, Michael Crichton) and staggeringly awful but maybe in a good way Tom Selleck "classic" Runaway (1984, Michael Crichton) in beautiful 35mm, always with shorts, goodies, and vintage trailers beforehand.
NEW BEVERLY LINK
























NuArt Theatre 
Endless Poetry (2016, Alejandro Jodorowosky)
Playing all week
The NuArt Theatre (an LA institution) has the latest film by cult auteur Alejandro Jodorowsky (El Topo, The Holy Mountain) playing all week, including a bonus midnight screening of his El Topo (1970) TONIGHT only. Just look at that poster to get intrigued. I haven't seen the recent Jodorowsky movies since his reappearance on the scene, but he's a towering figure of late '60s and '70s cult art cinema, so if you're going to jaunt to the big screen, this is the type of film to do it on.
NUART LINK

Cinefamily
The Sound of Music
Sunday July 16th 2:00pm
It's The Sound of Music (1965, Robert Wise). It's in 35mm. If you're a couple, this might be a seriously fun outing. PLUS, they are having a live puppet show performance before it. Great if you have kids.
CINEFAMILY LINK

Side note, later this theater is also showing the Happiness of the Katakuris (2001, Takashi Miike) Monday July 17th in 35mm (with Tetsuo: the Iron Man). This film has a mind-blowing premise, although the film is less good (to me at least) than the trailer, but hey if this trailer compels you, go!
Everyone who comes to this family's B&B in a bucolic countryside keeps dying, but it's a musical so they SING about it, and there are also little monsters killing everyone.


Cinefamily
Stalker
Thursday July 20th 7:00 pm
The new restoration of Tarkovsky's Stalker (1979) showing just Thursday this week, and there are only 2 more screenings after this, so seeing a great master's film on the big screen, the proper way, it's definitely going on my list. (This screening DCP)
CINEFAMILY LINK


New Beverly
Roboforce (aka I Love Maria)
Tuesday July 18 7:30 PM
I seriously loved this movie Roboforce (aka I Love Maria) (1988, David Chung). It's a Hong Kong Robocop rip-off with a lady as the Robocop (Sally Yeh from John Woo's Hard-Boiled). It has an AWESOME theme song that I once copied to cassette tape so I could drive around listening to it..

It's a double feature with Robotrix (1991, Jamie Luk) which I don't know anything about, but you know if New Beverly is putting it on it's going to be interesting.
Both in 35mm OF COURSE.

Here is the I Love Maria trailer with a bit of that AWESOME theme song (at 3:40 of trailer), and yes you are seeing John Woo and Tsui Hark cameos in the trailer (no subs though) and Tony Leung of Wong Kar-Wai fame being a total goofball.
NEW BEVERLY LINK


Eye on the future
Alert: Next Week, the Greatest Double Feature of All time:
At the Egyptian Friday July 21 is If... (1968, Lindsay Anderson) and Performance (1970, Donald Cammell, Nicholas Roeg), two landmark films of British "new wave" this is basically the greatest double feature I could ever imagine being concocted.  

If... is Malcolm McDowell gone mad in a British boarding school. And Performance is James Fox as a despicable London gangster who hides out from his bosses with a bunch of hippie musicians led by Mick Jagger who "open his eyes." They're both mind benders of the trippy '60s/'70s variety (not like a Matrix plot-twist). The only drawback is that you should really only see one at a time. This is the double feature of the year in my book.

Also next weekend July 21-23, the Old Town Music Hall has its best program of the year (esp. for you people who live near the beach) with its "All-Star Comedy Festival" of silent and sound comedy shorts, always exquisitely selected, on 35mm film. Every show begins with music played on the pipe organ, an audience sing along, and a comedy short.



Old Town Music Hall

Friday, July 07, 2017

Hot Screenings this Week

Here are MY hot Upcoming Screenings this week in LA if you are ready to get off your ass and watch some screenings in awesome 35mm film..! (and in sweet air-conditioning) Which is much better than anything your shitty "smart" phone can do.

If you want to make your own decisions (who does that?!), browse the LA Film Calendars links on my side bar  → → →

New Beverly Cinema:
The Border (1982, Tony Richardson) w/Jack Nicholson, Harvey Keitel
and Electra Glide in Blue (1973, James William Guercio) w/Robert Blake
Double feature playing Wednesday July 12 and July 13
This immediately came on my radar when I browsed the calendar as I've never seen either. I sat through both trailers last week, and I'm maximum interested now. These are some great throwbacks to a gritty, dusty barren western landscape '70s style of filmmaking, best seen in 35mm at the New Beverly's gritty theater. Plus there'll be shorts and campy '70s commercials in their amazing pre-program entertainment.

NEW BEVERLY LINK


Double Feature at Aero Theatre:
Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! and The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover
Thursday July 13 7:30 pm

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! is a classic Pedro Almodovar from 1989, probably his most well-known breakthrough film of that era at least, starring an "in-his-prime" Antonio Banderas as a totally crazy motherf'er. Learn who the captivating actress Victoria Abril is and confirm that the late '80s, early '90s were a better time for some types of weirdness.

Next, if you felt Helen Mirren was wearing too many clothes in The Long Good Friday (1980, John Mackenzie) at the New Beverly last week, the Peter Greenaway towering classic, by far his most well-known breakthrough film, The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover (1989) is for you. It's almost as pretentious as its title—almost? Yeah, it's totally bonkers, but in the best way.

Both films are from 1989, so you can literally pretend you are living back in time in 1989 for two screenings.Leave your cell phone at home for full effect.
AERO THEATRE LINK

Double Feature SATURDAY at the Billy Wilder Theatre:
The Best Man and Seven Days in May
Okay, to be fair, the only reason this is on my list? I randomly picked up the original Dr. Strangelove-era, nuke-codes-in-jeopardy book Seven Days in May (by Fletcher Knebel & Charles W. Bailey II) to read last week, and I'd seen the movie before, but maybe I ought to go see it on the big screen as I'm finding the book a real interesting fun pre-Tom Clancy throwback. The film is from 1964, directed by John Frankenheimer, who actually sometimes isn't as interesting as people say he is.

Then UCLA's site says of The Best Man (1964, Franklin J. Schaffner):
"Gore Vidal's eerily prescient drama dares to imagine what extremes two presidential candidates (Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson) might pursue in their fervent race to the highest office in the United States government."

Wow! Okay, I never heard of this before, which means it probably sucks, but as an apéritif to the Seven Days in May main feature, hmm.... probably not a bad throwback viewing to 1964.
BILLY WILDER THEATRE LINK

Nasty Habits at The Cinefamily
TONIGHT at 10:15pm:
I never heard of this film and it sounds amazing.
It's nuns, played by Glenda Jackson (awesome), Geraldine Page, Sandy Dennis (plus Eli Wallach and Rip Torn fit in somewhere), in a purposely transposed version of the Nixon Watergate scandal to a convent!
1977, Michael Lindsay-Hogg
In 35mm.

CINEFAMILY LINK
Side note: They're also showing British underground classic Scum (1979, Alan Clarke) with an impossibly young Ray Winstone (!) a few times this week (DCP) and newly restored version of Tarkovsky's Stalker (also in DCP).



Silent Film Freaks Rarity Alert:
Eve's Leaves (1926, Paul Sloane) at Cinefamily
Still showing silent films at what was once the Silent Movie Theatre, they dig up this Cecil B. DeMille-produced possibly-maybe classic from 1926 starring Leatrice Joy (I can confirm she is great at least) and William Boyd. In 35mm with live musical accompaniment.
CINEFAMILY LINK

The Thin Man at the Old Town Music Hall
If you live on the beach and are too lazy to go even to Westwood, why are you not going to this theater every weekend?!

They have a glow-in-the-dark gigantic Wurlitzer organ, play pre-show shorts, AND you can practice your singing with a sing-along section! (I'm not kidding)

And this weekend they're showing The Thin Man (1934, W.S. Van Dyke) w/William Powell and Myrna Loy sourced from the greatest detective novel writer Dashiell Hammett. On 35mm. A true, fun classic perfect for lazy people who live near the beach to saunter in to.
They always schedule screenings Friday 8:15, Sat. 2:30 and 8:15, Sunday 2:30

OLD TOWN MUSIC HALL LINK

Eye on the "future"
Next week at the Egyptian Friday July 14 is Subway and Le Dernier Combat, two trippy early Luc Besson films. Subway (1985) is a hell of a trip back in time, esp. on 35mm, when fluorescent lights were captivating and Christopher Lambert has never been sillier, plus- plus!- Isabelle Adjani. I'm curious to see Le Dernier Combat (1983) which preceded it and features Jean Reno. On the Egyptian's giant screen? No better way.
Also, the New Beverly has an intriguing double feature Friday July 14 and Saturday July 15 of Westworld (1973, Michael Crichton) and staggeringly awful but maybe in a good way Tom Selleck "classic" Runaway (1984, Michael Crichton) in beautiful 35mm with shorts and goodies beforehand.






Monday, January 04, 2016

UltraPanavision 70!! Film isn't dead! Temporarily!

Seeing "Hateful Eight" in UltraPanavision70 at Arclight Hollywood was awesome. Screw digital projectors. This reminds me how much better film is-- especially large format!


In addition to the picture, the Ennio Morricone score sounded awesome in that auditorium. Truly great score by one of the all-time masters.

The rest of the movie I'm not really a huge fan of, but it's visually stupendous to watch celluloid film displayed so large and beautiful on 70mm film. That's only at select locations across the country to see the 70mm, be sure to check.

With Spectre, Star Wars Force Awakens (35mm and some 70mm IMAX), Interstellar (35mm and a large amount of 70mm IMAX) shooting recently on film, maybe film isn't dead yet. This particular anamorphic widescreen 70mm format was last used on the 1966 film "Khartoum"!

But seeing it projected on film is critical. Yes, Star Wars Force Awakens has a great look by virtue of shooting on film, but almost nowhere can you see it projected on film (5 hours from LA, for example). Force Awakens only has digital projection, with a handful of exceptions (about 10? in the entire country) at fairly far-flung locations. Seeing the IMAX segments of Force Awakens at TCL Chinese, which was projected in Laser IMAX (digital), did not look as good as Interstellar which was projected in 70mm IMAX at that same location before they took out the film projector in favor of the Laser IMAX. Films shot natively and projected natively on film look better-- especially in large format.

From Indie Wire on Hateful Eight:
"Shot on 65mm film with classic Panavision lenses in the widest aspect ratio of 2.76:1, this marks the first anamorphic 70mm theatrical release in nearly 50 years. The two-week roadshow engagement—they're aiming for 100 theaters—would be the best holiday gift for cinephiles."
[...]
"And this is just the beginning, as Gareth Edwards' "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" is also reportedly being shot with Ultra Panavision 70 lenses. "
from:
http://blogs.indiewire.com/thompsononhollywood/how-quentin-tarantino-resurrected-ultra-panavision-70-for-the-hateful-eight-roadshow-20150828

Thursday, September 03, 2015

All Wet Crazy Irishman

Well, I'm half Irish. But this post isn't about me. It's about Leo McCarey. I watched a few movies lately, so it's time to post!

  • Have been reading this lovely old tome: Who the Devil Made It by Peter Bogdanovich 

This book has always been one of my greatest inspirations for my enthusiasm for silent film and classic film and, of course, great directors. There's probably nothing more engaging than the first interview in the book, the one with director Allan Dwan, which takes you through the birth of the silent era as if you were there. Anyway, yesterday I realized I hadn't read everything in this book, despite owning it since it came out! So I read the segment on Leo McCarey, the Crazy Irishman, as his section is headed. I think I avoided it because I haven't seen that many of his films, nor had he made much of an impression. However, it was great to read it. Now that I've gotten involved in sketch comedy writing and performing, as well as screenwriting, it was really fascinating to see how they came up with ideas so quickly and turned them into Hollywood movies almost on the fly sometimes. This matches my experience now in real life, to some degree, even though many stories are written carefully with more forethought as well. Both situations can create valuable work. When the inspiration for ideas is lightning quick, it is best captured when you are fortunate enough, like Leo McCarey, to have a job that is paying you to come up with those ideas.

Otherwise, for those poor fools (the rest of us!) toiling away trying to come up with one great indie movie idea, it's really a lot harder, and we can't seem to have the luxury of rapidly snatched ideas tried many times over the years. No one's paying us to snatch those out of the air, and they just kind of pile up until you lose enthusiasm for capturing them-- because there isn't a directly palpable outlet for them. It is almost equally important to develop and tweak those ideas with quick additions made on the fly during writing and even on the day of filming. An interesting tidbit from this interview that proves that point was Leo liked to stop filming and play piano on set while he waited for inspiration to solve a problem or get a particular bit of business just right. This reminded me of Jean-Luc Godard on Breathless (1959) writing for the entire morning of shoot days and then only filming in the afternoon. So brazen on a first film, can you imagine?! In this manner, previously written ideas get better. I have also realized this in writing live sketch comedy: by working with the actors, and seeing it on its feet, and then also utilizing their great ideas, the ideas finally start to achieve a comedic reality. It's a true collaboration-- always. And to stare at the blank page and hope it will fully come to life-- well, unfortunately there's not anything else for the struggling feature screenwriter to do, but oh, how there is still so much more to be done when it gets into the hands of the actors and director! The "idea," the script that we write-- that isn't a finished product. Only the film is, and that is a different animal, so of course "writing" essentially continues in a very different way. Directing and shaping performances can almost rewrite a scene without changing a line.

This book continues to be a great inspiration, and I luckily nerdily owned so many Charley Chase DVD sets that I was able to pop in one of the short silent films that Leo McCarey directed and watch it immediately after reading his interview. So that was really fun, and it was quite a fun Charley Chase comedy, although seemed only half survives of the 2-reeler. It was "All Wet" (1924) (thus my title above). Oh, darn, as I was checking that date on IMDB, it claims Janet Gaynor is an extra in it! Bollocks, have to go back and watch it again..! It was a fun movie despite only half surviving, with a really great gag with a car getting pulled further into the mud than you can imagine. It was not McCarey's first film directing. He directed some days on sets of Tod Browning features, but his own fully directed first feature (at least according to Bogdanovich's book) was Society Secrets from 1921, and I do not know if that one survives.

And embarrassing admission time now, all the most famous Leo McCarey movies, I haven't seen them! Really not sure how I missed so many films by a fellow Irishman! Maybe because he was born in California, so can't really trust that type of Irishman, can ya? My sad report is I had seen only Duck Soup and The Milky Way, plus the Charley Chase silent shorts and many Laurel & Hardy silents that he either directed or more often was supervisor (with frequent story origination or collaboration via oversight). So I feel well-steeped in his comic sensibilities from those Laurel & Hardy and Charley Chase films, but I guess it's time to watch his most acclaimed films that you've probably all already seen, but here are some of the bigger hits if you didn't know: The Awful Truth (1937), Make Way for Tomorrow (1937), Going My Way (1944), The Bells of St. Mary's (1944), An Affair to Remember (1957), Ruggles of Red Gap (1935), and Love Affair (1939).

But mainly just thanks to Peter Bogdanovich for writing such a great book and taking the time to interview all these directors, even when they were coughing on their deathbeds, as Leo McCarey was-- he practically helped kill him?! It's a pretty amazing thing when a book can inspire you to rush right out and try to watch the person's movies.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

The Moment of Truth (1965, Francesco Rosi) and Last Holiday (1950, Henry Cass)

Shorter posts better than no posts?

I watched two films from the amazing Videotheque rental store in Pasadena, CA

The Moment of Truth (1965, Francesco Rosi) severely disappointed, was quite boring. It wasn't shocking when I watched the bonus interview and he said he shot without a script! 
This is a go-nowhere, predictable bullfighting movie with excellent bullfighting footage.
It may be unduly praised for breaking ground in the latter, documenting something important in detail
and capturing all the elements of it.

But... it doesn't document the emotions of bullfighting, or the philosophical questions it can engender,
which I think Budd Boetticher does much better in Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and The Magnificent Matador (1955) with Anthony Quinn. I really would skip this and watch other Rosi like Hands Over the City (1963) and Salvatore Giuliano (1962), which are far more rewarding.

This was the second time I'd seen the lovely Alec Guinness film Last Holiday (1950), but I oscillated between like and dislike. First, delighted glee at how much fun it is, primarily with the main concept of how well he does once he no longer has anything to live for. Fascinating concept, but this time I noticed, despite his brilliant acting, ever engaging to watch, the script pops in a few contrivances and adds bits of business not that is not very well honed to a single main theme and muddies the sharpness of what could have been an intimate masterpiece. Some delightful character actor appearances, but I now swing back to my own British roots (born there) and join my British brethren at the time of release who found it a bit of a miss, as opposed to my original American reaction (I've lived here way longer!) which originally thought it was a masterful overlooked gem. Although this was a second viewing, so I think for theme and performance it is a compelling enough film to still warrant a hearty recommendation for a Saturday evening viewing.

Cheers, and I'll try to write more later!

Monday, November 11, 2013

Andy Warhol SLEEPover


Check out this exciting screening:

Watch Andy Warhol's Sleep, 5 hours!, nighttime screening, "bring pillows"!



Also, got a film? Screen it at Echo Park Film Center's "Open Screen" coming up Thursday Dec. 5.
Thursday, December 5 – OPEN SCREEN – 8 PM
Our cinematic free-for-all dares you to share your film with the feisty EPFC audience. Any genre! Any style! New, old, work-in-progress! First come, first screened; one film per filmmaker; 10-minute maximum. DVD, VHS, mini-DV, DV-CAM, Super 8, standard 8mm, 16mm. 
http://www.echoparkfilmcenter.org/cinema/schedule.html